Tenangos

tenangos1

Shopping for the brightly colored thread used in the style of embroidery done in villages around Tenango de Doria, a town in the Mexican state of Hidalgo. Credit…Celia Talbot Tobin for The New York Times.

The tenangos, as the embroidered pieces are called, have evolved into richly detailed works reaching a worldwide market.

Tenango embroidery is made by the indigenous Otomí community in the Mexican state of Hidalgo, whose main town is Tenango de Doria. The people call themselves hñähñu, and speak Otomí, an indigenous tonal language, along with Spanish.

tenangos2

Textiles in the distinctive style of embroidery done in San Nicolás, Mexico. Credit…Celia Talbot Tobin for The New York Times.

The vivid tenango embroidery designs are inspired by local vegetation and wildlife, and perhaps by nearby cave paintings and shamanistic healing ceremonies.

International brands such as Nestlé, Benetton, and Carolina Herrera have used tenango designs, sometimes without crediting their sources.

(Elisabeth Malkin, “This Mexican Village’s Designs Are Admired (and Appropriated) Globally,” NYTimes, 11-13-19)

(c) 2019 JMN

About JMN

I live in Texas and devote much of my time to easel painting on an amateur basis. I stream a lot of music, mostly jazz, throughout the day, and watch Netflix and Prime Video for entertainment. I like to read and memorize poetry.
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