Friday Morning

I’m struggling.

My remote interlocutor in life of the mind is keeping me afloat insofar as having a rational dialog with someone.

But that dialog is private. Of the muchness on my mind, I’m conflicted as to which of it matters much to say. However, as with the show, the blog must go on.

Language: My interlocutor and I are delving into the interesting topic of mass nouns versus count nouns and how they behave. The question sparking this exchange was whether or not the word “jam” ought to be plural. “Eggs and Jams” was written on a sign. The natives who know “less” versus “few” are the same as know “lie” versus “lay.”

Painting: On my easel is the second of two versions of a large man with a demented look pointing at his temple. MG, my studio manager, isn’t likely to expose these on the Shed’s FB page because the temple pointer is violently controversial. So one paints pointlessly the pointing man. (In pentameter, as it happens.)

Music: I’m working through the musical intervals — perfects, minors, majors — on the little Martin guitar. I’m trying to grok how intervals might help me know which notes my fingers are pressing. Also trying to read notation more fluently.

Poetry: I thought reading poetry again to figure out what purpose it serves would screen out scream culture. The “Scholls Ferry Rd.” disturbance put poof to the illusion. I had read Dickman’s poem before learning of Don Share’s abject resignation. The Daily Princetonian logs the opprobrium of offended readers at length.

Translation: My interlocutor asks if Spanish has nouns such as “jam” that straddle the mass-count continuum. I say yes. Nouns such as mermelada (jam), aceite (oil), and caridad (charity) lean toward quantity rather than number, but there can be many jams (flavors of) and “muchas mermeladas.”

(c) 2020 JMN

About JMN

I live in Texas and devote much of my time to easel painting on an amateur basis. I stream a lot of music, mostly jazz, throughout the day, and watch Netflix and Prime Video for entertainment. I like to read and memorize poetry.
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